30% of Israelis Identify as Bisexual

Everyone’s a little bit gay. Or, as recent studies have indicated, more accurately, one third to one half of people identify as bisexual. The newest study out of Israel,...

Everyone’s a little bit gay. Or, as recent studies have indicated, more accurately, one third to one half of people identify as bisexual.

The newest study out of Israel, found that 30% of secular Israeli Jews polled identify as neither exclusively heterosexual or homosexual, and instead fall somewhere in between.

The Israeli survey, conducted by the website Mako and the Panels Institute used the Kinsey scale where participants self-reported their sexual orientation along a 6 point scale. 0 is used to indicate being exclusively heterosexual, while 6 indicates being exclusively homosexual. Giving oneself a 1-5 rating is considered bisexual, or having some sexual interest in a gender other than your own.

For Israel, this study comes on the heels of the tragedy where six people were stabbed, with one fatally wounded, at the Jerusalem Pride event in July by an ultra-Orthodox Jew who had also attacked people at a previous Pride event.

In August, Israel also saw the release of a video that showed the prevalence of homophobia in Jerusalem, when two men secretly filmed reactions to their “boyfriend experiment,” where they walked the streets holding hands and recorded the slurs, insults, and dirty glares they experienced.

Israel, as a nation, is experiencing tension between more liberal, secular individuals who support same sex couples, and some of the more Orthodox, conservative individuals who do not support LGBTQ people.

This is not dissimilar to both Britain and America, who have each had surveys conducted where half, and a third, respectively, of young adults identify as bisexual. These surveys also bring to light a clash of culture within Britain and America, where LGBTQ individuals still face discrimination and violence, but are a significant portion of the population.

While we have not currently found studies tracking longitudinal LGBTQ identifications, we can hypothesize that more individuals feel safe to explore and openly admit to being LGBTQ, then in previous generations.

Image Courtesy of Peter Salanki, via Wikimedia Commons

Categories
Middle EastNews
Gwen Matthews

Gwen is a writer who has an education degree, a social work background, an extensive knowledge of vegetables, and a devotion to queer revolutionary politics. She lives deep in the woods of Maine with two dogs, a magnificent partner, and an ever-growing collection of plants.

RELATED BY