Paris Attacks Impact EU Stance On Refugee Crisis

  The French police have found a Syrian passport in the vicinity of the Parisian scenes in which the attacks took place Friday evening. It was situated near the...

 

The French police have found a Syrian passport in the vicinity of the Parisian scenes in which the attacks took place Friday evening. It was situated near the body of one of the attackers. Greece said that the owner of the passport reached Leros Island back at the 3rd of October. Serbia has added that four days later a person with that passport was registered in their frontiers as an asylum seeker.

There is no actual proof of whether or not the owner of the passport was one of the attackers: it could have been stolen, forged, or owned by one of the victims. But its discovery has indeed favoured speculations, notably since there has been a hot debate in Europe since summer about whether or not to give asylum to Middle Eastern refugees (especially Syrian).

The last plan to regulate the arrival of the refugees has been the distribution of a certain number of refugees in every country of the EU, depending on the capacity and capabilities of each country. It’s causing a huge discussion between the countries that accept the reception of asylum seekers and those who don’t.

Some authorities have made a connection between the Paris attacks and the refugees. The Minister for European Affairs of Poland, Konrad Szymanski, quite conservative, has declared: “Given the tragic events that have taken place at Paris, we don’t see any political possibility to apply [the plan]”. He has asked for security measures as a “key condition” to accept refugees.

The Bavarian finance minister, Markus Söder, has expressed the rising opinion among certain sectors of German politicians: “The days of uncontrolled immigration and illegal entry can’t continue just like that. Paris changes everything.”

The Parisian attacks have coincided with a G20 meeting in Turkey that had as its main issue, in fact, the refugees’ crisis before the rise of terrorism took its place as the priority. Jean-Claude Junker, the leader of the European Commission, has said in a press conference there that “the responsible of the Paris attacks… is a criminal and not a refugee nor an asylum seeker.”

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