Pioneer In HIV Detection Retires, Thinks The Finding Of The Virus’ Remission Is Possible

Françoise Barre Sinoussi (68), the French researcher who first identified the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, has announced her retirement. In an interview with Reuters, she has expressed her disappointment at...

Françoise Barre Sinoussi (68), the French researcher who first identified the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, has announced her retirement.

In an interview with Reuters, she has expressed her disappointment at the fact that a cure hasn’t still been found, expressing that it’s unlikely that it’s going to be discovered during her lifetime. She’s more positive, though, when it comes to remission.

“We have ‘proof of concept’’, she has declared, “We have…the famous Visconti patients, treated very early on. Now it is more than 10 years since they stopped their treatment and they are still doing very well, most of them.” She was referring to one of the most remarkable case of ‘remission’ achieved so far: a group of patients who began antiretroviral treatment since the first 10 weeks since being infected until three years later. Their levels of HIV are now, almost a decade later, so low that they are undetectable.

She has finished the interview by encouraging the new generation of experts to continue her work: “Science never stops. Just because a scientist stops, the science should not stop.” Back at 2008, she was the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Medicine alongside, among others, Luc Montaigner, her mentor, for her role in the discovery of the HIV back at 1983.

SOURCES:

Reuters

Image Courtesy of Prolineserver, via Wikimedia Commons

Categories
Europe

RELATED BY